Schedule

Image: Joe Shlabotnik

n.b. Abbreviations refer to individual symposia, which are listed below the table.

 Monday 6th AprilTuesday 7th AprilWednesday 8th April
9:00-9:30coffee & registrationcoffee & registrationcoffee & registration
9:30-10:30tbcplenary talk:
Dr Sabine Hauert
plenary talk:
Prof Peter Robinson
10:30-11:00coffee breakcoffee breakcoffee break
11:00-13:00PhAI2020
RACCT
AIML
AI&G  
Opacity
R&R
AIRoNoS
SoCAI
CC20
DoRoTa
Ana/Dig
R&R  
13:00-14:00lunchlunchlunch
14:00-15:30PhAI2020
RACCT
AIML  
Opacity
R&R
Anthro2020
SoCAI
CC20
DoRoTa
Ana/Dig
R&R
15:30-16:00coffee breakcoffee breakcoffee break
16:00-17:30PhAI2020
RACCT
AIML
Opacity
R&R
Anthro2020
SoCAI
CC20
DoRoTa
Ana/Dig
R&R
17:30-18:00breakbreakbreak
18:00-19:00plenary talk:
Prof Sophie Scott
tbcdepart
Eveningreceptionconference dinner 

Links to symposia

11th AISB Symposium on AI & Games (AI&G)

2nd Symposium on AI and Robotics Normative Spheres: Towards a Sustainable Society and Technology (AIRoNoS)

AI and Moral Learning (AIML)

7th Computational creativity symposium (CC20)

First AISB Symposium on Conversational AI (SoCAI)

Do Robots Talk? Philosophical Implications of Describing Human-Machine Communication (DoRoTa)

The Impact of Anthropomorphism on Human Understanding of Intelligent Systems (Anthro2020)

Philosophy after AI: meaning and understanding (PhAI2020)

Overcoming Opacity in Machine Learning (Opacity)

Representation and Reality In Humans, Other Living Organisms and Machines (R&R)

Responsibility and control: communication and conversation through technology (RACCT)

Workshop: Contesting the Analog/Digital Distinction (Ana/Dig)

Plenary speakers

Date: Wednesday 8 April
Speaker: Prof Peter Robinson, University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory
Title: Computation of emotions
Abstract: The importance of emotional expression as part of human communication has been understood since the seventeenth century, and has been explored scientifically since Charles Darwin and others in the nineteenth century.  Recent advances in Psychology have greatly improved our understanding of the role of affect in communication, perception, decision-making, attention and memory.  At the same time, advances in technology mean that it is becoming possible for machines to sense, analyse and express emotions.  We can now consider how these advances relate to each other and how they can be brought together to influence future research in perception, attention, learning, memory, communication, decision-making and other applications.
This talk will survey recent advances in theories of emotion and affect, their embodiment in computational systems, the implications for general communications, and broader applications.  The combination of new results in psychology with new techniques of computation on new technologies will enable new applications in commerce, education, entertainment, security, therapy and everyday life.  However, there are important issues of privacy and personal expression that must also be considered.
About the speaker: Peter Robinson is Professor of Computer Technology in the Computer Laboratory at the University of Cambridge in England, where he leads work on computer graphics and interaction. Professor Robinson’s research concerns problems at the boundary between people and computers. This involves investigating new technologies to enhance communication between computers and their users, and new applications to exploit these technologies. The main focus for this is human-computer interaction, where he has been leading work for some years on the use of video and paper as part of the user interface. With rapid advances in key computing technologies and the heightened user expectation of computers, the development of socially and emotionally adept technologies is becoming a necessity. He has led investigations of the inference of people’s mental states from facial expressions, vocal nuances, body posture and gesture, and other physiological signals, and also considered the expression of emotions by robots and cartoon avatars.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s